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Articles – Horsecare & All Topics Equestrian

Faecal sand testing now available

Faecal sand testing now available for horses to help reduce the risk of sand colic by monitoring sediment levels Colic is one of the most common emergency problems in the horse and has many different causes, one of which can be sand in the horse’s gut. Animals ingest it as they graze and it can accumulate…

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The Importance of Roughage in the Horse Diet

The horse’s diet has evolved over the years due to the way in which they have had to look for food, water and shelter. Horses are known as nomadic gregarious herbivores. Which means they move around in herds for safety, eating grass and other roughage they can find on their journey to find the sparse…

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Guidance for the recent outbreaks of Equine Flu and other contagious diseases.

As of the 13th February 2019 the British Horseracing Authority decided to resume racing. Thousands of samples where taken and tested by the Animal Health Trust and they are cautiously optimistic that the current outbreak of equine flu is relatively contained to a small number of cases. The British Equestrian Federation (BEF) continues to closely…

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Information about tetanus, flu, EVA, EVH and Ringworm

What are Vaccinations? Prevention is ultimately better than cure and vaccinations play an important role in preventing disease in horses. Vaccinations are used to: • reduce the risk of a disease outbreak occurring • reduce the spread of disease in the event of an outbreak • decrease the severity of illness in affected animals. Vaccinations…

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Thinking about fitness – an article by Sam Goss

When you are thinking of going out and about with your horse, you really need to make sure that he or she has been working and is fit enough otherwise you can cause injuries like a damaged tendon or sprained ligament, or simply a gall or pulled muscle. We need to think about their bodies…

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Getting ready for the lighter Evenings

Sam Goss entered the following article for the recent Hereford Equestrian blogging competition and won the runner up prize jointly with Ceri Belli. Here is Sam’s entry which was written before Christmas. Sam will regularly blog for Hereford Equestrian during 2019 and I’m sure you will find her articles very useful. Getting ready for the…

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Horse health professionals rally to determine best practice as “Equitape” horse wormer to be discontinued from October 2018.

Photo by Jon Stroud

From October 2018 the wormer brand, Equitape®, commonly used to treat tapeworm infection will be discontinued from sale in the UK. This wormer is the only licenced product for horses containing praziquantel as a single active ingredient. Going forward, it will only be available in ‘combination wormers’ also containing either ivermectin or moxidectin, the drugs…

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Applying for Jobs

As the owner of the Hereford Equestrian website I am regularly emailed by students coming to the end of their college course asking if I have any jobs available. As yet, not one of the emails has captured my attention and all for the same reason and what is that?…… The most recent one was:…

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Danger of Acorns Poisoning Horses

Oak trees and acorns are poisonous to horses

Horses can die if they eat a lot of acorns due to a toxin called tannins. Whilst most horses don’t usually bother eating acorns especially if there is adequate forage available, sometimes they will eat them. Other parts of oak trees are also toxic including the leaves if eaten in large quantities and this can…

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Use of Cryotherapy in the Equine Athlete

Immediately after an injury an inflammatory response begins with the migration of white blood cells called neutrophils and macrophages to the site of injury. Along with these cells inflammatory mediators also rush in. These inflammatory mediators increase the permeability of capillary walls allowing oedema to develop. Oedema is often visible as a swelling or puffiness…

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Understanding Collection and Why We Ask For It.

In true collection, the horse is required to shift his centre of gravity to the hind limbs, which should be well placed under the body. In doing so the pelvis tucks under, the spine raises and the horse has the freedom to ‘lift’ through the withers and out of the base of the neck. The…

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Which GP saddles for Welsh Cobs and Native Breeds?

The Horse Boutique

The Horse Boutique are often asked which GP saddles are particularly well suited for Welsh cobs and other native breeds, so have written an article with three great recommendations all currently in stock at the Horse Boutique. For further details about their quality new and used saddles, do please call their proprietor, Michael Burleigh, Master Saddler and…

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Colic

In a bid to prevent colic reaching critical stages, The British Horse Society and The University of Nottingham have launched REACT Now to Beat Colic. A comprehensive library of new resources has been produced to support horse owners about the wide range of issues relating to colic, in particular the steps that can be taken…

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Liability for riding accidents

If a rider falls from a horse and is injured, who is liable? A recent case which left a young girl permanently disabled, in which the court decided that the horse’s owner was liable for the rider’s injuries, having failed in her duty of care towards the girl, highlights the need for owners to think…

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Time to Worm? Think worm count first!

How to plan a targeted worm control programme based on tests. It’s the time of year for planning our horse’s parasite control, putting in place measures to ensure their wellbeing is covered for the year ahead with no unwelcome passengers. This no longer means developing a regular chemical programme – The British Veterinary Association and…

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Mud Fever

Mud Fever

  At this time of year there is no shortage of rain and mud within the three counties in which we reside. For many reasons it is advisable to maintain some degree of field turnout during the winter months.  Many of you will be familiar with Mud Fever or ‘pastern dermatitis’ as an irritation of…

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Equine Business – The essential guide for professionals working with horses.

Includes: Starting your own business. Accounts made easy. Legal advice on contracts. Finding the right insurance. Selling horses. Livery yards. This article is the first issue of helpful and essential guides to those running an equestrian business. The article has been put together by experts in their field who have an understanding of the equestrian…

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Preventing Back Pain in Horses

By Mel Betts, McTimoney Animal Practitioner. Back pain in ridden horses is a common issue.  As riders we sit on the weakest point of a horse’s back and then ask it to perform tasks it was never really designed to do! So how can we prevent them becoming sore?  Correct tack fitting and good farriery…

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Starting a ‘stable’ business?

Should you incorporate your equine related business? Protect your personal assets from liability We are often asked whether it is advisable for an equine related business to incorporate into a limited liability company. It is becoming increasingly common to hear of stories where traders, trainers, riding school owners and others within the profession lose their…

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Hay or Haylage? The Feed Debate, by Lucy Harris

Hay and Haylage; what is the difference?  Hay is completely dried. Haylage is semi-dried. One is baled, the other is wrapped. But are these the only differences between hay and haylage? How do these differences affect the nutritional value? Can they have differing influence on horses’ performance, health and wellbeing? Time to find out. The…

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Harness Racing, what is it?

When you say harness racing to most people they think it is the scurry racing that they see at horse of year show. It could not be more different! It is an adrenaline packed sport which is getting more competitive each year with higher standards of horses being imported. If you were to compare the…

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Horse Passports – what you need to know…

“The horse passport regime has been under intense scrutiny in recent months following the discovery of horse meat which had entered the human food chain unlawfully.  As a result there likely to be continued focus on the legislation governing this area, the Horse Passports Regulations 2009 (“Regulations”),  by enforcing authorities long after the media focus…

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Using a Riders Mind to Improve Performance

Have you ever said to yourself “I hate show jumping because I can never see a stride” and then you enter the arena and promptly miss at ever fence! Have you ever considered what goes on in your head and how your thoughts can become a self fulfilling prophecy? 

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Loan Agreements

Loaning out your horse or having a horse on a loan may seem like the perfect solution when funds are tight however in reality loaning out a horse has many potential pitfalls and loans of horses are often the subject of bitter legal disputes. It is therefore important to have a bespoke loan agreement in…

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Rats

Update: From 1 October 2016 farmers, gamekeepers, pest controllers and their employees buying professional rodenticide packs for use outdoors will need to show either an approved certificate of competence or document confirming membership of an approved farm assurance scheme. Click here for more information There can be few horse owners who have not at some time…

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Watch videos of lessons with Sue Nevill-Parker using a Riding Simulator.

Take a look at the latest videos of lessons with Sue Nevill-Parker using “Blackberry”, the Riding Simulator. See other lessons here – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p24XuMlN_yo You will also find several new articles in the Library section of www.arrowequestrian.co.uk and new articles written by Erik Herbermann. In facts lots to enjoy! Thanks Sue for sending these useful links

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Arena Construction & Planning

An excellent article has been written by Gill Davies of Martin Collins Arenas. It answers the questions sent in by website visitors and gives invaluable information on this complicated subject. As Gill says at the beginning of the article, “All your questions illustrate the mine-field you unwittingly enter if you are considering installing new stables or…

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Questions received re Arena construction and planning

The article below was written by Gill Davies of Martin Collins Arenas. It answers the questions sent in by website visitors and gives invaluable information on this complicated subject. As Gill says at the beginning of the article, “All your questions illustrate the mine-field you unwittingly enter if you are considering installing new stables or an…

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Colic

This article was written by Three Counties Equine Hospital & is reproduced with their permission. www.tceh.co.uk What is Colic? Not only does the mere mention of the word “colic” send many owners into immediate panic, it can also be one of the most challenging of conditions for vets to diagnose and treat. Colic isn’t a…

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Has My Horse Got a Sore Back?

Every day, we ask our horses to perform tasks which put stress and strain on muscles really only ever designed to eat grass and roam at will.  However, because horses are ‘prey’ animals they have cleverly developed to hide signs of pain and discomfort which may make them more vulnerable to a predator on the…

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Equine Cushings Disease (ECD)

ECD is a condition that mainly affects middle aged to older horses and ponies caused by an abnormality of the pituarity gland leading to overproduction of hormones and cortisol. This leads to the classic signs associated with the disease such as a long curly coat, lethargy, laminitis, weight loss, increased drinking and secondary infections.

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Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging

DITI (Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging) is a non-invasive diagnostic test of physiology that has evolved over the last 20 years. DITI has been recognised as a useful tool in the early identification of musculoskeletal and neurological injuries, especially non-specific (and difficult to diagnose) lameness. The ability to detect inflammatory and neurological processes at an early…

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Beau – A Canker Case History

Nicola Battersby is a happily married mother of two and the proud accidental owner of a 16.2hh KWPN Gelding by Corland called Beau that she bought in March 2010.  Initially Nicola was looking for a horse to do some dressage on, but fell in love with the unbroken 4 year old grey gelding when she…

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Winter Care of the Horse or Pony: Common Conditions & Disorders

Under normal circumstances the horse’s skin and protective coat form effective barriers against the winter elements. However, in very wet and muddy conditions this natural barrier can often be compromised and infectious agents (pathogens) gain entry and cause infection.  This can result in the relatively common bacterial infections: rain scald, mud fever and hunting dermatitis.…

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Sustainable worming and the value of worm egg counts

Worming has changed over the past 50 years since broad spectrum wormers were introduced  in the 1960’s. Back then the main worm being targeted was the large redworm (strongylus vulgaris). This parasite can cause damage to blood vessels that can lead to fatal colic. However over the past 50 years this parasite has become uncommon…

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Going barefoot – a new approach to healing

An article by Angela Corner AANHCP Certified Practitioner Most alternative therapies can equally be described as natural therapies – side stepping the use of drugs or surgery to aid problems using natural, non-invasive methods. In other words working with natures own healing powers as opposed to bull dozing nature out of the way in favour…

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Going Barefoot – can anyone do it?

An article by Angela Corner – AANHCP Certified Practitioner You’ve read about it, agonised over it, trawled the internet and talked to horsy friends, your farrier and maybe even the vet but you’ve finally decided to take the shoes off your horse and try going barefoot. It’s a big step – all those centuries of…

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Ragwort

Horses die a painful death if poisoned by ragwort.  You’ve seen the plant – it has a yellow ‘flower’ on a long green stem and is often seen in abundance on the side of roads, but is it also in your paddocks! If so, you need to pull it up straight away! Read on…. This…

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Laminitis Trust

The purpose of the Laminitis Trust is to raise money for laminitis research. They provide a lot of helpful information if you have a horse or pony suffering from laminitis. Visit their website here: www.laminitis.org/

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Article on Laminitis

Here are some useful links to information on laminitis: www.laminitis.org/laminitis.html http://www.equinehealthonline.co.uk/browser/index.php?lang=eng&practice=74&cat=005&article=000328 http://www.beva.org.uk/useful-info/HorseOwner/GuidanceHorseOwners/Laminitis

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New Forest Ponies – versatile and world-beating!

New Forest ponies are one of the most versatile breeds and compete in all disciplines from dressage and driving to eventing and endurance. Recent high profile competitive successes for the breed include the stallion Farriers Finger Print, who stood Mountain and Moorland Supreme Ridden Champion at Olympia 2009.  A team of New Forest ponies from…

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Welfare of Horses

The welfare of horses is in our hands. As a horse owner you have a legal obligation to care for your horse/horses properly.  But, as horse owners, we also have a moral obligation, not only with our own horses welfare,  but also with the welfare of others. If you have any concerns re the welfare…

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What is Natural Horsemanship

So what exactly is Natural Horsemanship. We’ve all heard of Parelli, Monty Roberts, Kelly Marks, Intelligent Horsemanship and the Horse Whisperer, but what is it and is there a difference between the methods used by the above mentioned? http://www.naturalmatters.net/  helps describe the definition of Natural Horsemanship: All Natural Horsemanship trainers teach a way of dealing…

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Constructing an arena

The following thoughts and guidelines are based on my experience. Firstly, you have to consider the requirements you have for an arena. The main considerations are: Is your arena mostly for jumping or flatwork, or maybe lungeing. How much use will it have, what is your budget and what space have you available for the…

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Mud Fever

An article produced by Three Counties Equine Hospital Mud fever is a common skin condition caused by the soil bacterium Dermatophilus congolensis. The bacterium penetrates skin damaged by abrasion and /or wet conditions. The lower legs – at the back of the pastern, are typically affected. When present on the neck and back, the infection…

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The Rules of Feeding

Feeding – An art or a science? – Or both! Firstly, do you know the rules of feeding and why they are rules? Below the rules, I have listed a few facts you may not know and which may surprise you! The Rules: Feed little & often The horse has a very small stomach –…

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Strangles

Strangles is a disease which all horse owners dread and it can kill. If you suspect your horse may have strangles, you should contact your vet immediately and isolate your horse. More information can be read on the Animal Health Trust’s dedicated strangles website: http://www.strangles.org/ Click here to see what STEPS should be taken in…

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